Winter / Spring 2022 Courses

Spring 2022 Course Formats

Spring 2022 Courses will be both in-person and online via Zoom. Details below.

COVID-19 Safety Requirements

After careful consideration, ALL  aligns with WWU's guidelines and will continue to adjust as new guidelines are announced. 

Masks are optional for all individuals university-wide.  This applies to all WWU and affiliated programs, including ALL.  ALL highly recommends the use of N95, KN95, or properly fitted surgical masks and respects all individuals who continue to wear masks indoors. Proof of "fully vaccinated" (two shots for Pfizer/Moderna, one shot for J&J) will continue to be verified for all instructors, facilitators, and students participating in all courses, field trips, and excursions. 

CDC recommendations regarding initial and subsequent booster shots can be found at the following link per CDC guidance.

If you would like a low-key practice session to become more familiar with Zoom, please email Michou for additional information.

December Courses

Thursdays, December 2 and 9, 2021
10-11:30 a.m.
$36 for members, $45 for non-members


VIDEO:ALL December 2021 Instructor, Minda Rae Amiran:

Robert Frost liked to portray himself in his poems--and also in later public life--as a plain, somewhat melancholy, New England farmer, full of down-to-earth country wisdom. But some of his best poetry reveals a different person, a man acutely sensitive to the suffering of women in a man's world, a searcher questioning our place in the universe and what we can know about it.

This course will consider some of these less-widely-known poems, in two discussion sessions of an hour-and-a-half each. In the first, we’ll explore two of Frost’s longer dramatic poems about the feelings of women caught in difficult home lives. We’ll also compare these two poems with extracts from similar ones by Frost’s possible models, to better understand Frost’s innovations in this form.

In the second session we’ll discuss a number of short poems in which Frost asks what we can know about our world or anything at all. Again, we’ll look at a few comparable poems, this time by contemporaries Frost knew, and with whom he might have talked about these problems.

The class will be limited to 12 participants, so that everyone (who wishes to) can contribute to our collective exploration of the poems, which will be provided in advance in pdf or Word format.

Registration ends November 25, 2021

Instructor: Minda Rae Amiran

Minda Rae Amiran, Professor Emerita of the State University of New York at Fredonia, started teaching English as a graduate student at Harvard University in 1954 and continued at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv University, and SUNY Fredonia, retiring in 1999. Her field is modern American literature with an emphasis on poetry and literary theory.

Register for Robert Frost

Wednesday, December 15, 2021
1-3 p.m.
$24 for members, $30 for non-members


VIDEO: ALL December 2021 Instructor, Adam Moles

Perhaps no single part of the human body is as critical to our survival as the immune system, and no other components has had nearly as much nonsense published in the popular press. The immune system is made up of the cells, organs, and chemicals that fight infections. The main players are intestinal bacteria, white blood cells, antibodies, and the lymphatic system. We will survey each of these with an eye toward how vaccines, disease, and nutrition do and do not influence the immune response. No science background necessary since this lecture will be a quick overview rather than an in-depth class on this most complex of systems. 

Registration ends December 8, 2021

Instructor: Adam Moles

Dr. Adam Moles teaches medical microbiology at Western Washington University.

Register for The Immune System

2022

January Courses

Thursdays, January 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2022 
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
$96 for members, $120 for non-members

 

VIDEO: ALL January 2022 Instructor, Rosemary Vohs

Get your stories to jump off the page and have a life of their own. This lively workshop will teach you the art of traditional storytelling as you learn to perform multicultural folktales. Through the use of Active Imagery techniques, you will learn how to deliver stories without the use of scripts, creating the "scene" in your audiences imagination.  
 
Learning to be a storyteller will enhance your natural expression, widen your physical animation, sharpen your improvisational skills, and generally heighten your capacity to entertain others. Learn how to really connect with your audience, characters, and imagination while freeing your internal actor become a storyteller! 

Registration ends December 30, 2021 
 
Instructor: Rosemary Scott Vohs 

Rosemary Scott Vohs was classically trained in performance arts in her native England where she began presenting literature at the age of six with the London Academy for Music and Dramatic art.  Rosemary has been a faculty member at WWU since 1985, teaching storytelling, public speaking, and instructional communication. As a performance storyteller and narrator, Rosemary is frequently featured at festivals, school arts programs and musical events. Rosemary is a founding member of the Bellingham Storytellers Guild and has served as chair of the National Storytelling Conference.

Register for Tales with Tails

Tuesday, January 18, 2022 
10 a.m. - 12 p.m. 
$24 for members, $30 for non-members 

Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal

VIDEO: ALL January 2022 Instructor, David Drummond

The order of Falconiformes, or the diurnal raptors of the world, have long held the imagination of people everywhere. Here, in the Northwest bio-region, we are blessed with diverse habitats to support these highly specialized avian predators. This 2 hour class will provide an introduction to their field ID, habitat associations, winter prey finding strategies, and behavioral ecology of the 12 species possible to find during the temperate winter. Participants are encouraged to hone their skills during the field trip listed separately in the catalog. 

We are offering this one session in-person class, a shortened version of the online course offered in Winter 2020. It is designed for those who wish a review or who were unable to take the class in the winter. Please feel free to sign up for the review session—or for the Field Trip as a stand-alone. 

Registration ends January 11, 2022 
 
Instructor: David Drummond 

David Drummond is a wildlife biologist/naturalist who has specialized in field study of raptor biology over a lifetime and has done extensive field research on Merlins and Peregrine Falcons, as well as, hawks and owls worldwide 

Register for Wintering Diurnal Raptors

Wednesday, January 19, 2022
8 a.m. - 2 p.m.
$72 for members, $90 for non-members


VIDEO: ALL January 2022 Instructor, David Drummond

Resident and migrant hawks, eagles and falcons are present on the river deltas of western Washington during the fall to early spring. On our driving and stopping field trip (with some short easy walks), we will explore their field ID, habitat associations, prey, and behavioral ecology in this exciting, in-depth look at these fascinating predators.

This field trip can be taken as a stand-alone or with the one-session course on January 18, 10 AM-12 PM.

Meet and return at the Bellingham Cruise Terminal Parking Lot. ALL Drivers WILL NEED a WA State “Discover Pass” to access some public lands.

Registration ends Jan. 12

Instructor: David Drummond

David Drummond, wildlife biologist/naturalist, has been captivated by hawks since his youth. Their freedom of flight, amazing life histories, niche breadths and intriguing behavioral ecology has kept him questing their secrets for decades! Learn more about his project on Northwest Merlins at: coastalforestmerlinproject.org

Register for Wintering Diurnal Raptors Field Trip

Thursdays, January 20 and 27, 2022 
1-3 p.m. 
$48 for members, $60 for non-members
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal

 
The 1960s marked a turning point in United States and international history. The habits and lifestyles of the ‘60s and ‘70s generations have become embedded in our politics and culture. The course examines events leading into the ‘60s, the major events of that decade, and their effects in subsequent years up to the present day. Particular attention will be given to changing generational outlooks since then until now, as well as their domestic and global effects today. 
 
Registration ends January 13, 2022 
 
Instructor: Ted Van Dyk 

Ted Van Dyk was at the center of political and cultural change from the 1960s onward as a Pentagon, White House and State Department official, Vietnam War opponent, policy director of several Democratic presidential campaigns, and vice president of Columbia University during campus disorders there. He is the author of Heroes, Hacks and Fools (University of Washington Press, 2007), and writes essays regularly for The Wall Street Journal and other national publications. 

Register for The Turbulent 1960’s

Wednesdays, January 26, and February 2 and 9, 2022 
10 a.m.- 12 p.m. 
$72 for members, $90 for non-members
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal

 
VIDEO: ALL January 2022 Instructor, Mary Chamberlin 

Molluscs are one of the most intriguing and diverse group of organisms on the planet, with body plans as varied as those seen in a crawling snail, a burrowing clam, or a jetting octopus. It is estimated that there are 50,000 to 200,000 living molluscan species and these animals play important roles in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. 

For thousands of years humans have used molluscs as a source of food and luxury goods (jewelry and dyes) but have also suffered from their poisonous bites and stings, the diseases they carry, and their destruction of cultivated plants. Despite our long-standing interaction with these soft-bodied creatures, most people know little about their biology. 

Through the use of slides and videos I will explain how the diverse body plans of molluscs evolved, how they reproduce, grow and develop, how their organ systems operate, as well as discuss their role in human culture. 

Registration ends January 19, 2022 
 
Instructor: Mary Chamberlin 

Dr. Mary Chamberlin is a professor emerita at Ohio University where she taught, undergraduate, graduate, and medical school physiology. She has conducted research on the physiology and metabolism of mammals, fish, marine invertebrates, and insects and has served as a program director at the National Science Foundation. 

Register for Biology of Molluscs 

February Courses

Thursdays, February 3, 10 and 17, 2022 
1-3 p.m. 
$72 for members, $90 for non-members 

Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal

VIDEO: ALL February 2022 Instructor, Rabbi Samuels

We will examine how keeping the Sabbath and eating, or not eating, specific foods has kept the Jewish people together for thousands of years. Rabbi Samuels will also explain Jewish beliefs about loss, death and beyond. He will present these three topics in a way that will demonstrate both the practical and philosophical aspects of Judaism. 

Participants will view ancient as well as modern Jewish texts which will help shed light on why these are significant topics to Jews living in the modern world. 

Registration ends January 27, 2022 
 
Instructor: Rabbi Joshua Samuels 

Rabbi Joshua Samuels has been serving Congregation Beth Israel in Bellingham as its spiritual leader for 10 years. A native of San Francisco and alum of University of Wisconsin-Madison, Rabbi Samuels received his ordination from Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Jerusalem and Los Angeles. He was the recipient of The Samson H. Levey Memorial Prize for showing greatest promise in the study of Rabbinic literature and Talmud. 

Register for Judaism in Three Nutshells

Saturdays, February 12 and 19, 2022 
1-3 p.m.
$48 for members, $60 for non-members
Location: The Ferndale Public Library Meeting Room

VIDEO: ALL February 2022 Instructor, Donald Antenen

History is written by the victors, as the bon mot goes, but to fully examine the past we must attend to the losers as well. We will read and discuss writings from the losers in American history, not to condemn them, but to understand them as they understood themselves.  

In the first session we will read Loyalist arguments against American independence and Anti-Federalist arguments against ratification of the Constitution.  

In the second session we will read Confederate arguments for secession and arguments against women's suffrage. This is a seminar style course that presupposes no expertise and requires no preparation. All texts will be provided in class. Class size is limited to 12 registrants since active interaction and participation is encouraged.  

Registration ends February 5, 2022 
 
Instructor: Donald Antenen

Donald Antenen studied Greek, Latin, & Biblical Hebrew at the University of Pennsylvania and the Liberal Arts at St. John's College in Annapolis. While in Philadelphia, he founded and led an annual community seminar on Plato.

Register for Reading the Losers

Tuesday, February 15, 2022 
10 a.m. - 12 p.m. 
$24 for members, $30 for non-members
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal 

 
VIDEO: ALL February 2022 Instructor, David Drummond 

Temperate salt and fresh waters of western Washington are very attractive to wintering waterfowl. Their migrations to these favorable feeding deltas are renown. Think about traveling from the northernmost North American rim, clear south to our shores and beyond! We will learn about the life histories of these intriguing, feathered animals from locally and afar in this single 2-hour class. Participants are encouraged to take the Field Trip to the Samish and Skagit Flats to view these birds in the wild, practice your field ID skills and learn about their wintering behaviors. 

We are offering this one session in-person class, a shortened version of the online course offered in Winter 2020. It is designed for those who wish a review or who were unable to take the class in the winter. Please feel free to sign up for the review session—or for the Field Trip as a stand-alone. 

Registration ends February 8, 2022 
 
Instructor: David Drummond 

David Drummond has worked professionally with waterfowl and on his own field studies for many years. He has traveled globally as an Ornithologist/Naturalist and Educator. He loves teaching about this diverse and captivating group of water-adapted birds. 

Register for Northwest Swans, Geese and Ducks

Wednesday, February 16, 2022 
8 a.m. - 2 p.m. 
$72 for members, $90 for non-members
Location: Skagit and Samish Flats

 
VIDEO: ALL February 2022 Instructor, David Drummond 

Temperate salt and fresh waters of western Washington are very attractive to wintering waterfowl. Their migrations to these favorable feeding deltas are renowned. Think about traveling from the Arctic clear to our shores and beyond! We will learn about the life histories of these intriguing, feathered animals on our field trip to Skagit and Samish Flats (with some short easy walks). Flocks of these beautiful white to rainbow-colored birds await our viewing! 

This Field Trip can be taken as a stand-alone or with the one-session class on February 15. ALL drivers WILL NEED a WA state “Discover Pass” to access several public lands areas. 

Registration ends February 9, 2022 
 
Instructor: David Drummond 

David Drummond, wildlife biologist/naturalist, has worked professionally with waterfowl at Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife, Northwest Trumpeter Swan Conservation Association surveys, and on his own field studies for many years. He loves teaching about this diverse and captivating family of water-adapted birds. 

Register for Northwest Birds - Field Trip

March Courses

Saturdays, March 5, 12, and 19, 2022 
10 a.m. - 12 p.m. 
$72 for members, $90 for non-members  

VIDEO: ALL March 2022 Instructor, Tim Morgan


Do you enjoy traveling to natural areas that conserve the environment, that sustain the well-being of the local people, and that provide interpretation and education? If so, you will thoroughly enjoy this course.   

The first session will introduce the concepts, principles, and social/ecological impacts of ecotourism. In week two you’ll learn about the various types of ecotourism and their economic benefits. You will be provided with plenty of resources and will hear from two guest speakers. You will learn how to evaluate eco-friendly tours. 

By the third session you’ll be ready to plan your own successful ecotourism trip. We welcome the expertise of Tim Morgan who will be Zooming in from New Mexico.  

Registration ends Feb 26 
 
Instructor: Tim Morgan 

Tim has over 15 years of experience in the tourism industry and has promoted ecotourism in his various tourism roles, including as an instructor in Hospitality & Tourism Management at Highline College. He is currently employed as Vice President of Economic Development at New Mexico Partnership in Albuquerque.  
 
Register for Ecotourism

Tuesdays. March 8, 15 and 22, 2022 
1-3 p.m. 
$28 for members, $35 for non-members 
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal  

VIDEO: ALL March 2022 Instructor, Valerie Randolph

 
Spring Special -- join us in March for Vaccines and Viruses at a reduced rate!

Vaccines are the greatest advances in medical history, saving millions of lives. No other medical interventions have had such a profound influence on the reduction of disease and death.  The emergence of COVID-19 in the last two years has shown us that infectious diseases are still a huge problem for all of us – and vaccines are still the best solution.  

This course will give a brief history of vaccines and modern advances in vaccinology.  

  • How are vaccines developed? 
  • What are the different types of vaccines? 
  • How do they work and how do we know they work? 
  • How are they approved? 
  • How do we know if vaccines are safe and effective?   

We will discuss these issues, particularly in the context of COVID-19 vaccines and other respiratory viral vaccines. A science background is not necessary for this course. Be prepared to learn some basic virology and viral immunology. 
 
Registration ends March 1 

Instructor: Valerie Randolph 

Dr. Valerie Randolph is a retired virologist and a former Associate Director in Pfizer’s Vaccine Research group. She worked for 23 years in the pharmaceutical industry, primarily in the research and development of respiratory viral vaccines. Dr. Randolph received her PhD in microbiology from the UC Berkeley School of Public Health and has published 25 papers on vaccines and viruses. 
 
Register for Vaccines and Viruses

Wednesdays, March 9 and 16, 2022
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
$48 for members, $60 for non-members
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal

VIDEO: ALL March 2022 Instructor, David Tucker

 
Our DNA is an amazing molecular microscope! Found in each of our cells, DNA tells the story of life from Day 1 all the way to “now.”  By examining ancient DNA in teeth (called aDNA) researchers are deciphering and rapidly rewriting human history – such as why the Roman Empire faltered and why the Mayans perished.  

Epidemiologists know that although microbes are the source of pandemics - it is peoples’ actions that actually cause pandemics. We will study why the Black Plague (~1350 AD) started as a mutated microbe that caused the deaths of 1/3 of Europe’s population. We will compare cultural dynamics of that time period to our own Covid-19 societal issues of today.  Ancient genomes tell the story.   

You will leave this class with a general understanding of how mutations do their sleuthing and how DNA sequencing technology works to unravel the story of where we came from and how we got here. 
 
Registration ends March 2 
 
Instructor: David Tucker 

David Tucker is a retired science teacher who studies popular science. As part of his Masters degree work he performed DNA sequencing activities on plant pheromones that required 60 labor hours and 2500 protocol steps. Now, the same process is completed in 1-2 hrs max and the base pairs can be read using a cell phone app. 

He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation's Presidential Award for Teaching Excellence and has taught classes in ALL since 1996. David feels a general understanding of how science operates in daily life is a valuable tool. 
 
Register for Historical Perspective on Pandemics

Monday March 21, Wednesday March 23, and Friday March 25, 2022
2-4 p.m.
$72 for members, $90 for non-members

VIDEO: ALL March 2022 Instructor, Lina Zeine

 
The Baha’i Faith is a recognized independent world religion established by Baháʼu'lláh in the 19th century in Persia but is now attracting increasing attention and a growing number of followers in the US and around the world as people search for practical spiritual solutions for their lives.  It is the second most widespread of the world's independent religions in terms of the number of countries where adherents live. 

Baha’i teaches the essential worth of all religions, the oneness of God, and the unity of all people, openly rejecting notions of racism and nationalism. This class will introduce participants to a thoroughly inclusive religion, which accepts the divinity and sanctity of all Faiths. 

We will look at the teachings and principles given by Baha‘u’llah (1817-1892), whom Baha’is around the world regard as the Messenger of God for this day. We will also look at how the faith is administered, community building in the US and around the world today, and the Baha’i vision of an unfolding divine plan for the future. 

Registration ends March 14 
 
Instructor: Lina Zeine

Lina Zeine was born and raised in Beirut, Lebanon. She obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. Lina retired as Professor Emerita from WWU’s department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Topics in religious history are her passion. Lina has presented this course, and several other history courses on frequent occasions at Baha’i summer schools. 

Register for Baha'i Faith

Wednesdays, March 23 and 30, 2022
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
$48 for members, $60 for non-members
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal

VIDEO: ALL March 2022 Instructor, Jon Riedel

 
How are glaciers related to climate change and freshwater resources in the North Cascades? This course will assess what modern climate change means to glaciers and regional water supplies. We will explore the ice age records of past climate changes reconstructed by examining glacial deposits and ancient glacial lake sediments. We will then continue the story from the most recent ice age to current glacier monitoring in Washington. This will include a photographic comparison of glacier change from the early 20th Century until today. We will look at recent analyses of changes in glacial contribution to summer streamflow in the past 50 years and a projection of the future of glaciers in this region. 
 
Registration ends March 16 

Instructor: Jon Riedel

Jon Riedel is a glacial geologist who recently retired after a 40-year career with the National Park Service. The focus of his research has been on the sensitive response of Washington’s glaciers to climate change from the last ice age 30,000 years ago to the modern warming climate. Dr. Riedel established glacier monitoring programs at Olympic (2013), Mt. Rainier (2003), and North Cascades (1993) National Parks to track changes in more than 500 glaciers. Jon is a founding member and President of the Skagit Climate Science Consortium, a nonprofit organization focused on understanding the impacts of climate change on the Skagit River watershed and making the information available to local decision makers. He holds a MS degree in geography from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a PhD in earth sciences from Simon Fraser University. 

Register for Blue Ice and Fossil Water

April Courses

Wednesdays April 6, 13, 20, and 27, 2022
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
$96 for members, $120 for non-members
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal

VIDEO: ALL April 2022 Instructor, Kathy Kuba

 
People throughout the Americas have lived in varied environments that shaped their cultures over the millennia.  With the arrival of European settlements in the Americas beginning in 1492 profound changes took place across the Americas, Europe, and Africa.

Plants, animals, and other resources were taken east across the Atlantic.  Can you imagine Ireland without potatoes? Italy without tomatoes?  Asian foods without chilies? These foods are indigenous to the Americas.  The movement of food plants, new medicines, and resources from the Americas enriched the lives of rulers, merchants, and even lower classes across Europe. By the late 1500s common people in larger European cities had silver coins in their pockets – silver from Bolivian mines.

Moving westward across the Atlantic were enslaved Africans first to the Caribbean, then to other colonies to face a wretched existence.  A terrible threat to indigenous Americans was carried into every region: diseases that killed on average 80% of the local people for they had no natural resistance.

Join us as we learn about Pre-Columbian America, Europe and Africa in the 1500s, and the collision and exchange that came with sustained contact.
 
Registration ends March 30

Instructor: Kathy Kuba

Kathy Kuba has been an educator all her life and an anthropologist for the last 25 years with a B.A. in Education from the University of Missouri and M.A. in Anthropology/Museology from the University of Washington. For several decades, she worked in natural history museums creating programs and exhibits on cultural and scientific topics. Until 2020 she taught Introduction to Cultural Anthropology at WWU.

Register for Columbian Exchange

Thursdays, April 7 and 14, 2022
6-8 p.m.
$48 for members, $60 for non-members
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal

VIDEO: ALL April 2022 Instructor, Rose Kular

 
Sikhi was a religion founded in 1469 in Punjab, India, by Guru Nanak Dev Ji, playing a major role in the history of India and the rest of the world. In this course, we will discuss the origins of Sikhi, its economic and political impacts. We will discuss its cultural influences including striving for social justice. We will look at some common elements in Sikhi such as the turban, Sikh music, and Sikh martial arts.
 
This course is also designed to include the impact of modern-day Sikhs. How do Sikhs operate in the US and other countries? What is the role they play in Whatcom County’s history?
 
Registration ends March 31
 
Instructor: Rose Kular
 
Rose Kular was born and raised in Ferndale WA. Throughout her life Rose has participated in Mata Sahib Kaur Khalsa Punjabi School, where she learned how to read/write/speak Punjabi, play the harmonium, recite the holy scripture, and much more. She is currently a student at Western Washington University where she is majoring in Business Administration and minoring in Law, Diversity & Justice.

Register for Sikhi History

Thursdays, April 7, 14, 21, and 28, 2022
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
$96 for members, $120 for non-members

VIDEO: ALL April 2022 Instructor, Katherine E. Zoraster

 
The United States is home to some of the best art collections—and some of the most interesting and eclectic art collectors—in the world. This course crosses the country looking at the origins of some of America's more notable art museums.

We begin with the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, founded in 1805 as the first and oldest art museum and school in the country. We then visit other notable museums such as the Frick Collection, the Barnes Collection, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, among others.

We will explore the colorful personalities responsible for the collections, the architecture of the museums, the various types of art and artists held within and favored by each collector, and the issues surrounding collecting and display from each period covered.

WEEK 1: The Emergence of American Collections and the Course of Empire

WEEK 2: Robber Barons and Barons of Industry-Collectors of the Gilded Age

WEEK 3: The Power of Women in Art Collections and Museums

WEEK 4: Collecting Modern Art in America

Registration ends March 31
 
Instructor: Katherine E. Zoraster

Katherine E. Zoraster is an Art Historian, w/ a B.A. in Art History from UCLA and an M.A. in Art History with distinction from CSU Northridge, CA. She currently teaches for Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes at UCLA and Channel Islands, the Los Angeles Academy of Figurative Arts, and Cal Lutheran’s 50 and Better Program.  She also lectures at Moorpark College, Pierce College, and CSU Northridge in California. Katherine also serves as a commissioner for the Burbank Cultural Arts Commission. 

We are pleased to welcome Katherine via Zoom from southern California.

Register for American Art Museums and Collectors

Tuesdays, April 12 and 19, 2022
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
$48 for members, $60 for non-members
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal

VIDEO: ALL April 2022 Instructor, David Drummond

 
Western Washington’s temperate climate creates an early season opportunity for local exploration of the fascinating diversity of showy plant life. We will learn in class about the representative families of open conifer meadow, closed mixed forest and coastal sand dune communities through colorful imagery, discussion of their field identification, adaptations, and ecological connections. What a great way to get into early spring fun in the beautiful Northwest!

Registration ends April 5

Instructor: David Drummond

David Drummond has always enjoyed the inspiration and excitement of spring and summer wildflowers! He has taken WWU Northwest botany classes, conducted personal study, developed flower and plant education programs, attended lectures and field trips of the Washington Native Plant Society, assisted with National Park Service sub-alpine and forest plant re-vegetation projects and many other enrichment programs. David continues to learn about the many adaptations of the world’s flora and is particularly intrigued with high Arctic and mountain plants.

Register for Spring Lowland Wildflowers
 

Wednesdays, April 20 and 27, 2022
1:30-3:30 p.m.
$48 for members, $60 for non-members
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal

VIDEO: ALL April 2022 Instructor, Michael Petryni

 
Digital film making has allowed filmmakers, animators, and artists/musicians to explore the wide range of genre and styles in narrative, documentary, and experimental short story telling. Contemporary Shorts vividly illustrate the amazing variety of this art form.

Viewing through the perspective of an award-winning scriptwriter, discussing, and analyzing short films that are available at festivals, in theaters and online, the potential of this art form will emerge.

Participants will be given a discount to the short film offerings at the CASCADIA International Women's Film Festival in Bellingham.
 
Registration ends April 13

Instructor: Michael Petryni

Michael Petryni is a former television writer/ producer of network television movies and mini-series.  He was one of NBC's top television movie writers from 1988 to 1996 and has eight produced television films to his credit. He is a recipient of the Christopher Award for his television movie “Child in the Night.” He wrote for a number of television series including Spencer for Hire, Moonlighting, Matlock, and Knot’s Landing. He was a recipient of the Bellingham Mayor’s Arts Award in 2007.

Register for Contemporary Short Films
 

Tuesday, April 26, 2022
8a.m. - 3 p.m.
$48 for members, $60 for non-members

VIDEO: ALL April 2022 Instructor, David Drummond

 
In conjunction with or separate from the two-part class study, we will then enjoy a fun, naturalist-led visit to diverse floral habitats on our field trip to beautiful Deception Pass State Park. On an easy walk you will learn the species field ID and macro- to micro-habitat associations. Join us for an insightful journey into the wonderful world of wildflowers!

DO bring a lunch/water and, yes, there are tables for our lunch. A hand lens, camera and/or binoculars will come in handy.

Deception Pass State Park via our personal cars. *We will all need a Discover Day Pass to visit this state park. We can car caravan from the Bellingham Cruise Terminal, or you can meet us at the South Deception Pass Bridge parking lot on the west side of the road by the restrooms.

* If you don't already have this pass you can purchase a day pass in the parking lot with a credit card.

Registration ends April 19
 
Instructor: David Drummond

David Drummond has always enjoyed the inspiration and excitement of spring and summer wildflowers! He has taken WWU Northwest botany classes, conducted personal study, developed flower and plant education programs, attended lectures and field trips of the Washington Native Plant Society, assisted with National Park Service sub-alpine and forest plant re-vegetation projects, and many other enrichment programs. David continues to learn about the many adaptations of the world’s flora and is particularly intrigued with high Arctic and mountain plants.

Register for Spring Lowland Wildflowers Field Trip

May Courses

Wednesdays, May 4 and 11, 2022 
10 a.m. - 12 p.m  
$48 for members, $60 for non-members  
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal 

VIDEO: ALL May 2022 Instructor, David Tucker

 
Imagine taking a picture of something that is trillions of miles away! Or, how about taking a picture of something you cannot see at all—like a black hole? By combining gravity wave and light wave observations, astronomers are discovering secrets of the cosmos on a weekly basis—and many of them right here at LIGO, our very own gravity wave observatory near Richland, Washington.  Join me to explore how new advanced observatories will unveil even more strange characteristics in the cosmos—discoveries that Albert Einstein thought impossible to achieve. 
 
Registration ends April 27 
 
Instructor: David Tucker 

David Tucker is a retired science teacher and an astronomy hobbyist. He spent time at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey studying laser physics. Presently, he is an ambassador presenter for LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravity-wave Observatory) at Richland, Washington. 

He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation's Presidential Award for Teaching Excellence, and he believes everyone can benefit from learning about the cosmos we live in.

Register for Amazing Discoveries

Wednesdays, May 4 and 11, 2022 
1-3 p.m. 
$48 for members, $60 for non-members 
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal 

VIDEO: ALL May 2022 Instructor, Debbie Gan
 

Americans are living longer but dying slower.  For many, that will mean needing care at some time in their lives.  This class will review medical services for debilitating conditions and the many care options available when one cannot remain independent.

Information will be provided on a variety of services available to help you or your loved ones remain safely at home, as well as residential care options.  The class will address the cost of these services, who pays, and how to access each of them.  We will also review the role of care managers and client advocates and the importance of putting a support team in place.

Effective pre-planning can prevent you from being forced into making critical decisions in a time of crisis. 

Registration ends April 27

Instructor: Debbie Gan 

Debbie Gann, CSA, has been working in healthcare since 1987 and has become a recognized advocate for the rights of seniors in our community. She is the owner of Home Attendant Care, past president of Elder Service Providers and the Alzheimer Society of WA as well as founding member of the WA Private Duty Assoc and the founder of a “Touch of Grace”. 

Register for When Care is Needed
 

Thursdays, May 5, 12, 19 and 26, 2022 
10 a.m. - 12 p.m. 
$96 for members, $120 for non-members 

VIDEO: ALL May 2022 Instructor, Eleanor Schrader

 
Every city has a particular feel about it; defined by its architecture, demographics, geography, climate, and the people and cultures who have shaped the city over time.

This course will explore the history of the iconic structures that identify four West Coast cities: San Francisco, Portland, Seattle, and Vancouver. We will learn about the architectural styles and the socio-political context in which these buildings were created and developed.
 
Registration ends April 28

Instructor: Eleanor Schrader

Eleanor Schrader has an MBA from Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles and has done graduate work in Fine and Decorative Arts at Sotheby’s in London and New York, and in Architectural History at USC. As an architectural historian, she is an award-winning educator, a Professor Emerita of Art and Architectural History at Santa Monica College and lectures worldwide on the history of architecture, interiors, and decorative arts and leads art and architecture tours throughout the world. She has been named a Distinguished Instructor of design history at UCLA Extension.   

We are pleased to have Eleanor zoom from southern California.

Register for Architecture That Defines

Tuesdays, May 10 and 17, 2022 
7- 8:30 p.m.  
$36 for members, $45 for non-member 

VIDEO: ALL May 2022 Instructor, June Hopkins

 
The secession of the southern states in 1860, the Civil War that lasted until 1865, and the attempts to reconstruct the nation in the aftermath of that war, marked a turning point in our history.

After the war, the political, economic, and social landscape of the nation changed dramatically. Attempts at re-admitting the seceded states led to dissension between Congress and the President, between the political parties, and between the North and the South. This history is important because the successes and failures of Reconstruction still impact political discourse today.

These two lectures will cover the proximate events that led to the war, a brief examination of the war, and an in-depth investigation of the twelve years of Reconstruction.
 
Registration ends May 3 
 
Instructor: June Hopkins

Dr. June Hopkins, professor emerita Georgia Southern University, Armstrong Campus, taught 20th century American history in Savannah for 18 years.  She received her Ph. D. in American history from Georgetown University in 1997 and is working on her third book.

Register for Rebinding the Ties That Bind
 

Monday, May 16, 2022
1:30-3:30 p.m.
$24 for members, $30 for non-members
Location: Unity Church of Bellingham

VIDEO: ALL May 2022 Instructor, Kay Zavislak

 
Participants will learn about the inspiration and the background associated with three compositions for the piano from the Romantic Era: Papillons by Robert Schumann (1831), Sonetto 104 del Petrarca by Franz Liszt (1859), and Ballade No. 4 by Frédéric Chopin (1842). The genre of “program music,” a type of music that aims to tell an existing extra-musical story, particularly flourished during the 19th century Romantic era.  The instructor will discuss, demonstrate, and highlight unique aspects that were representative of this genre through solo piano works.  The course will include a live performance of these pieces by the instructor.

Registration ends May 9

Instructor: Kay Zavislak

American pianist Kay Zavislak enjoys a multi-faceted career as a performer, teacher, adjudicator, and clinician.  As a performer, Dr. Zavislak has given solo recitals and chamber concerts regionally and nationally, in addition to public performances overseas.  Before joining her family in Bellingham in 2013, Dr. Zavislak was an Assistant Professor of Piano at the University of Idaho Lionel Hampton School of Music and is currently on the faculty at the WWU Department of Music.

Register for Unfolding of a Narrative 
 

Wednesdays, May 18, 25 and June 1, 2022 
1-3 p.m.  
$72 for members, $90 for non-members  
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal

VIDEO: ALL May 2022 Instructor, David Wu

Have you ever wondered how Boeing, a venerable corporation with a strong reputation for safety culture, could have developed a product that led to two crashes and extended grounding of the entire fleet of 737 Max airliners?

This course will look at how the commercial aircraft industry operates from both the engineering and business perspectives:

  • How aircraft are developed and certified (by regulatory agencies)
  • Competitive pressures – pricing, time-to-market, operating efficiency
  • How corporate culture contributes to design and business decision-making
  • Unintended consequences from “overloaded” systems

The course encourages students to think about the trade-offs often necessary in the real world, and how corporate culture and ethics have evolved. Topics to be covered:

  • Introduction to the commercial aircraft industry: airframe, engines, major aircraft systems  
  • Fundamentals of flight & aircraft evolution  
  • Business considerations: market trends, market segmentation, competitive positioning, business case  
  • Product development, product development teams, regulatory oversight 
  • Corporate culture evolution  
  • What lessons have we learned?

Registration ends May 11 
 
Instructor: David Wu

Dr. David Wu’s career in the aerospace industry spanned over 40 years and included Rockwell, Honeywell, and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft of Canada, LTd. He earned an M.B.A., from Arizona State University and his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Toronto, Canada. He most recently retired to Bellingham from teaching at the University of Iowa in the Depts of Mechanical Engineering and Management & Entrepreneurship.

Register for What Can We Learn

Wednesdays, May 18 and 25, 2022
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
$48 for members, $60 for non-members
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal

VIDEO: ALL May 2022 Instructor, Pam Brady

 
First session: follow the flow of crude oil through a BP refinery to learn how the “oil is boiled” through processes that result in gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, liquid natural gas, asphalt, butane, and inputs to aluminum. Information will be provided on logistics of the business, regulatory compliance, and marketplace.

Second session: We will examine future challenges in transitioning to new energy sources to meet growing global energy needs with a lower carbon footprint. Engineers are innovating sources of energy from wind turbines, solar, and bio-fuels in addition to making traditional fuels greener. We will examine how offsets, low carbon fuel credits, and other BP programs reduce the global carbon footprint. We will discuss the pros and cons of the multiple alternative fuels available and the complexities of advancing the energy transition from oil to alternatives.

Registration ends May 11

Instructors: Pam Brady and Tom Wolfe

Pam Brady is a Government Affairs Manager for BP, responsible for government relations, external communications, and community outreach at BP Cherry Point Refinery. She has spent 20 years in the industry. She is a graduate of Western Washington University. Pam serves on the executive board of the Whatcom Business Alliance, is the past president of the Bellingham Technical College Foundation Board and serves on boards for Friends of Birch Bay State Park and WWU College of Science and Engineering Advancement.

Tom Wolfe has been with BP for the past seven years. His current role is as BP’s Senior Government Relations Manager – U.S. West Coast. Tom focuses on issues and opportunities for the company in Washington, Oregon and California. Prior to his time at BP, Tom was Executive Director of the Illinois Chamber of Commerce’s Energy Council in Chicago, where he led the Council’s charge to develop environmentally responsible, fact-based and cost-effective energy policies. 

Register for Energy Production 

June Courses

June 1, 8 and 15, 2022
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
$72 for members, $90 for non-members
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal

VIDEO: ALL June 2022 Instructor, David Drummond

 
Every day of our Northwest lives, birds are nearby. We see them and hear them, but what do we really know about their life histories? We will not only learn how to identify them by sight and sound with confidence, but also about avian habitat associations, basic biology, and their behavioral ecology.

This class focuses on the resident chickadees, bushtits, wrens, kinglets, waxwings, blackbirds, finches and sparrows (9 families of 36 species) through three lectures and a local field trip.

Whether you took the first class (or not), you will learn exciting insights to help you better enjoy our diverse flyers of forest to farm!
 
Registration ends May 25
 
Instructor: David Drummond

David Drummond enjoys exploring the world’s natural and cultural history with you! David has been involved in ornithology since age 5. He awakes early with the birds every day. He leads wildlife tours around the planet as a naturalist and wildlife specialist, lecturer, and photographer. He also works regionally as a wildlife biologist with the Coastal Forest Merlin Project. David writes nature articles, enjoys creating poetry about his time with people and nature, and is hard at work on a Merlin book project.

Register for Songbirds Course 

Thursdays, June 2, 9 and 16, 2022 
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.  
$72 for members, $90 for non-members   
Location: Bellingham Cruise Terminal 

VIDEO: ALL June 2022 Instructor, Ronald Quinn

 
Wildfires, racing through forests, grasslands, and shrublands of the American West, have recently become larger, more widespread and more intense, and dangerous.  
 
The climate is changing, our uses of the landscape are changing, and the forests are changing too. When summer smoke arrives, we are starkly reminded of these trends, even when they are far away. We will examine in depth these interrelated changes, how and why they have come about, and how we can address them to create a safer and more pleasant environment. 
 
Session I:  
Fire and Human History 
Vegetation and Wildfires in Washington 
Other Western Landscapes 

Session II: 
Wildfire Patterns in Washington and beyond 
East of the Cascades: Plains, Prairies, Palouse 
Natural Fire adaptations 

Session III: 
Public Safety and Wildfire Management 
Past, Present, and Future: 3 centuries, 3 practices 
Creating Firesafe Homes  
Climate, Weather, and Regional Smoke  
 
Registration ends May 26 
 
Instructor: Ronald Quinn 

Dr. Ronald Quinn earned his PhD from Princeton University.  He was Professor of Biology and Regenerative Studies at California State University, Pomona for 40 years, where he was also Director of the Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies. He was a visiting Senior Fulbright Research Scientist at Universidad Complutense in Madrid, studying fire ecology in the mountains of rural Spain. Dr Quinn has researched and written about fire ecology for the past half-century and was a cooperating research scientist with the U.S. Forest Service for 30 years. 

Register for Fire in the West

Tuesdays, June 14 and 21, 2022 
10 a.m. - 12 p.m. 
$48 for members, $60 for non-members 

VIDEO: ALL June 2022 Instructor, Robin Rieck

 
Immediately after delegates signed and approved the United States Constitution on September 17, 1787, anti-Federalists attacked it as giving too much power to the central government.  They argued against ratification by the necessary nine states. In response, John Jay, Alexander Hamilton, and James Madison wrote the 85 Federalist Papers and published them in newspapers.  

These Federalist Papers are important because they explain and justify how the U.S. Constitution works and why it was designed the way it was. 

James Madison’s Federalist Paper #10 is one of the most important of our foundational documents. We will examine #10 in detail, not only because it provides insight into the brilliance and prescience of James Madison but also because it is so applicable to our current situation, when so many state legislatures are attacking the very foundation of our representative democracy. 
 
Registration ends June 7 
 
Instructor: Robin Rieck

Dr. Robin Rieck earned an MBA in 1975 and Ph.D. in Business in 1983 from the UW.  At WWU he taught Business, Government and Society and Business Statistics from 1981 through 2002. Federalist #10 was required reading in many of those classes and he has also given public lectures on its significance. Since retiring from academics, Dr. Rieck has kept busy by helping rebuild a sailboat, managing a machine shop, and running his own handyman business. 

Register for James Madison

Thursday, June 16, 2022 
6-9 a.m. 
$36 for members, $45 for non-member 

VIDEO: ALL June 2022 Instructor, David Drummond

 
Early morning is a wonderful time to learn the field ID by sight and sound, habitat associations, and behavior of our local songbirds. We will sample several different habitats in search of 36 species of nine plus families covered in the related class. 

Join us for this exciting experience that is an easy, slow walk near ponds, fields and forest edges to find our feathered friends! 

June 16 (in-person) Field Trip. Meet at Scudder Pond. We will walk the easy Scudder Pond Trail and then the also easy North Shore of Lake Whatcom. 
 
Registration ends June 9 
 
Instructor: David Drummond

David Drummond enjoys exploring the world’s natural and cultural history with you! David has been involved in ornithology since age 5. He awakes early with the birds every day. He leads wildlife tours around the planet as a naturalist and wildlife specialist, lecturer, and photographer. He also works regionally as a wildlife biologist with the Coastal Forest Merlin Project. 

Register for Songbirds Field Trip